More to do in Valencia

There is so much to see and do in Valencia. If you checked our previous post ‘Daytrip Valencia’ out yet, this is a not to be missed update. Forget the old town and markets, we get off for the lessknown neighbourhoods.

L’Eixample

The L’Eixample district (halfway between the Torres Serranos and the city of arts and sciences on the southeast side of the Turia) is great fun to explore. Part of the L’Eixample district are the artistic, creative and alternative neighbourhood Ruzafa and the hip and trendy neighbourhood Canovas.

Ruzafa is a neighbourhood full of artists, vintage shops, cozy bars, live music bars, book bars and innovative restaurant concepts. In the weekends terraces are full of people enjoying Spanish life. Cánovas is a neighborhood where you’ll find many restaurants, delicatessen shops and designer boutiques.

In Ruzafa there is the traditional central market Ruzafa and in Cánovas you’ll find the previous central market Colon. Which now is a foodmarket. It marks the difference between the two neighbourhoods.

El Cabanyal

From the city of arts and sciences you can also walk straight into the old fishing district of El Cabanyal. With children, public transport can be a good option in terms of distance. You will find plenty of nice eateries in the district. Or wander towards the water. Here you will first find the large marina and the harbor of the Volvo Ocean race.

There are often free outdoor performances on the pier at Marina Beach Club. You can eat paella with a view of the sea on the boulevard of Playa de las Arenas beach. You can take the tram directly behind the boulevard back to Maritim Serreria. Here you can then take the metro again into the city or towards the P+R.

Benimaclet

For real Spanish conviviality you have to go to Benimaclet. Here you will find many affordable tapas restaurants and a cozy village center. Because of the market on Friday, small organic shops and cozy terraces, you will not notice that you are in a big city. Many artists and students live in this district. There is plenty to do here. You will often find live music in a tiny bar, or a pub where everyone fanatically plays a Triviant quiz. The hip retro dance Lindy Hop is danced indoors and outdoors on the street. Due to the good connections with metro and tram, this is an ideal neighborhood to get to know the city.

Some food tips

Although Valencia is very touristy, when it comes to meal times they are very Spanish. This means that lunch is eaten between 2:00 PM and 3:00 PM. And dinner from 8:00 PM. They often open a bit earlier than these times. During the morning, around 10:00/11:00, they eat a sandwich or some tapas. The main meal is in the afternoon. Many restaurants serve a menu, where you get two or three courses for little money, with or without a drink and dessert.

Recently some new food markets opened their doors. So, check out Mercat de la Imprenta and Mercader Cabanyel for a night out or a food experience. Do you like to cook yourself? There are plenty opportunities to get yourself into paella cooking.

Last tips …

  • The city is – especially by Spanish standards – very bicycle-minded. There are many cycle paths and cyclists often have priority. Rent a bike and explore the city yourself or with a guide. At Verrassend Valencia they have nice bicycles, a route map and possibly also a guide. They are in located in Ruzafa
  • Do you have a day or some time left? Then take the bus or cycle to the freshwater lake Albufera south of the city. Here are the rice fields for the famous paella rice. Take a boat trip on the water (can also be booked through Verrassend Valencia) and eat paella in one of the nice coastal towns. Finish the day with a beach visit to the beautiful sandy beach
  • Visit the Mestalla football stadium of the Valencia football club
  • Valencia promotes itself as a sportminded city. Therefore, the focus on cycling. But even more popular is Valencia, Ciudad del Running. Participate in a full or half marathon!

Did you miss our first post about Valencia? Check it out here.